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Dec 4, 2012 2:00am PST
. >>> call it the fiscal cliff follies, because with 28 days remaining before massive tax hikes and spending cuts kick in, democrats and republicans are ridiculing each other's ideas. it's a recipe for recession. the gop offering up its first plan which calls for $2.2 trillion in deficit savings over the next decade, including $800 billion in tax reforms, 600 million in medicare reforms and spending cuts. but the president rejected it outright because it does not contain tax hikes for the rich. time is running out. any sign of serious negotiation on the horizon? >> i'd say on the horizon, that would be fair. the log jam that you're watching, we're expecting to continued likely until next week. so don't be surprised if you see that. i think the policy prescriptions here, what needs to be done to find a package for deficit reduction are clear. right now you're watching the politics play out. all you need do is open your ears, listen to the white house, listen to congressional republicans you'll hear them playing the blame game. >> making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping d
Dec 5, 2012 2:00am PST
over the fight in the fiscal cliff. americans face crushing tax hikes and severe spending cuts in 27 days if democrats and republicans cannot come together on a deal. by the way, congress breaks for the holidays in ten days. slash that number. in an interview with bloomberg news, the president made it crystal clear he's not about to blink on the issue of tax hikes for the wealthiest americans. >> we'll have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> white house correspondent dan lothian joins us live from washington this morning. very nice to see you, dan. >> good to see you. >> here's the deal. we have republicans pitted against democrats. now we understand there are issues amongst republicans as well. >> that's right. they're in a tough spot here. they don't want to be in left in a position of being blamed for the fiscal cliff. you're seeing a division between house members and senate members. the reason for this is mainly over the 800 billion in new tax revenue. this was part of john boehner and plan. those tea party-backed co
FOX News
Dec 3, 2012 10:00am PST
the white house fiscal cliff package. the white house's proposal to avoid the big tax hikes and spending cuts that are going to happen in january, unless something is done. that proposal has come under heavy criticism from republicans who say wasn't serious. how speaker john boehner said he was flabbergasted. mitch mcconnell reportedly laughed out loud and in this debate over reducing the debt, the president is pushing for an additional $255 billion in spending. he wants those higher taxes to spend more, which is leading to some criticism. joining me now is brad blakeman, the former deputy to george w. bush. and chairman of the south carolina democratic party. a deal that is all about the republicans desire to cut back on the debt and deficit -- why would the president be proposing $255 billion in war spending? >> well, he's not. what he is proposing is shifting spending priorities. after those cuts, shifting priorities, and by the way -- this is infrastructure development. this is to make sure that people who have gone the payroll tax relief keep that payroll tax relief and expanding un
Dec 5, 2012 3:00am PST
of the business round table, amid a debate over the fiscal cliff. the group is urging congress to take immediate action to avoid those automatic tax increases and spending cuts come january. president obama is saying that with the way speaker boehner plan stands now, no deal. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal is out of balance. we will have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we are not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> that was an exclusive with bloomberg t.v. and the first televised interview since the president's re-election. as you heard, taxes are the big issue blocking this deal from taking place. president obama is calling for downhill the amount of tax revenue as speaker boehner over the next tens years, most from the nation's top earners. many. republicans say that's not the way to handle this. here is marco rubio. >> it wouldn'ting make a small bent in the debt but it would heard middle class businesses. >> the g.o.p. could be risking a civil war over this issue. it does not look like obama is ready to cave. if that forc
FOX News
Dec 4, 2012 3:00am PST
for averting the fiscal cliff. the republican plan seeks $800 billion through tax reform and mandatory spending cuts. the white house said that the republican proposal falls short of what the president wants and cannot be taken seriously. >> we understand they don't agree with everything but we have not seen alternatives for them and they spoke about the need for revenue and that acknowledgment is welcome. but thus far republicann leaders are adament don't believe rates should go up on the top two percent of the american people. the american people disagree. rates have to rise and the republicans need to acknowledge that. >> that's the major difference between the two sides. tax hikes for the rich x. republicans want tax reform and eliminate deductions and closing the loop holes. the president said on twitter, there can't be tax cuts at the rich at the expense of domestic programs. >> the biggest problem with president obama is he is a small-pinded president in big times . he talk about 35-39 that doesn't get us out of debt. >> that is tough rhetoric for senator lindd say graham. the president
Dec 3, 2012 11:00am PST
cliff. we now know that we're 29 days away before the massive spending cuts and tax increases go into effect automatically the beginning of the year. the white house presented their plan and now just today we're getting news on the side of the republicans. ali velshi, chief business correspondent, let me bring you in. the first major difference, let's be crystal clear and run through this proposition, the fact that they want to extend the bush era tax cuts for everybody. >> right. something that some 67% of americans said that they don't agree with, something the white house says is a nonstarter. however, they have put a proposal forward. i suppose if you're negotiating, you don't put first proposal forward, the one you're going to end up with. this is from house speaker john boehner in a 2 1/2 page letter to the president, it proposes $2.2 trillion in cuts. and let me show you how they get there. $800 billion in tax reform. that is closing loopholes and credits. $600 billion in health care and medicare changes. $300 billion in other mandatory savings. $300 billion in discretiona
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6